Penalties For Speeding

Penalties For Speeding

If you are caught speeding, it’s likely that you will be faced with a £100 fine and have 3 penalty points added to your licence.

If you have 12 or more penalty points on your licence that were added in a 3 year period you could be disqualified from driving.

Penalty Points

Also known as “Endorsements”, penalty points can be given to you by the court if you are convicted of a motoring offence. The penalty points will need to stay on your licence for at least 4 years, and up to 11 years, depending on the motoring offence.

If you have 12 or more penalty points on your licence that were added in a 3 year period you could be disqualified from driving.

- Endorsement codes and speeding

The following codes along with the required penalty points will be added to your driving record. Below you will find details about the various codes that are used, why they are used, and the number of penalty points given.

SP10 – Exceeding the speed limit on a goods vehicle – 3 to 6 penalty points

SP20 – Exceeding the speed limit for the type of vehicle (This is not including passenger vehicles or goods vehicles) – 3 to 6 penalty points

SP30 – Exceeding the statutory speed limit on a public road – 3 to 6 penalty points

SP40 – Exceeding the passenger vehicle speed limit– 3 to 6 penalty points

SP50 – Exceeding the speed limit on the motorway – 3 to 6 penalty points

Pay a Fine

If you are ordered to pay a fine you must do so via the Government’s website (Gov.uk). The letter that has been sent to you by the DVLA will tell you when the payment is due and how much you will need to pay.

If you fail to pay the fine before the deadline your vehicle could be clamped. There’s also a risk that your vehicle could be crushed. Alternatively, your details could be passed onto a debt collection agency.

Appealing a Fine

If you don’t think you should pay your fine you can appeal against it. People usually appeal against a fine if they were not driving the vehicle when it was speeding. You might be able to submit an appeal to your local police. You should write a letter explaining why you do not think you should have received the speeding ticket.

You can also request to see the evidence that the police have. For example, they might have a photograph of your vehicle at the time of the alleged incident. This photograph could be useful as it might show who was driving. It’s also useful in case there has been an error in identifying the vehicle.

The court will need to prove that it was you who was driving. They will also need to prove that you were travelling faster than the speed limit at the time of the alleged incident.

Driving Fines When You’re not the vehicle’s Owner

If you have received a speeding fine and you’re not the vehicle’s owner, this is what you should do:

Return the letter to the sender and tell them you are not the owner of the vehicle. It is important that you keep a copy of everything you send.

If you have never owned the vehicle in question, contact the DVLA and ask them for proof that you are not the vehicle’s owner.

If you used to own the vehicle you should again, contact the DVLA and ask for proof. You should also mention:

  • The vehicle’s make and model
  • The vehicle’s registration number
  • The date of the transfer or sale
  • The name and the address of the individual you sold or transferred the vehicle to